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Hannants News: 07/12/18

In stock; Modelcollect range of AFV and Aircraft

The latest Hot News can now be viewed here....  https://www.hannants.co.uk/latest-news/

3 new Wingnut Wings now in stock!

Airfix 1:48 Blenheim now in stock!

We are now despatching orders to Canada again.

Due Soon

Hong Kong Models  HKM01E06 1:32 Avro Lancaster B.Mk.1 

Tamiya TA61119 1:48 Supermarine Spitfire NEW TOOLING 

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Unit 2, Hurricane Trading Estate
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London, NW9 5QW
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Top Selling New Items for Last 7 Days

  1. MKM14483: de Havilland Mosquito B.IV ‘Wooden Bomber’ (RAF) The de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito was a British multi-role combat aircraft developed in 1939. The Mosquito was constructed almost entirely of wood and, as such, it was dubbed “The Wooden Wonderˮ. Originally conceived as an unarmed high-speed bomber, it was later adapted to many other roles, including day-time tactical bomber, night bomber, day or night fighter, fighter-bomber, maritime interceptor and photo-reconnaissance aircraft. The Mosquito B Mk.IV was a day and night bomber variant, whose prototype first flew in September 1941. Some 300 aircraft were built (incl. Srs.I a/c); Series II model entered service in May 1942. It was a two-seat, twin-engine, mid-wing monoplane, of a composite wood construction, fitted with a retractable undercarriage. The crew was seated under conventional canopy and for bombing a glazed nose was provided. It was powered by two Merlin in-line engines turning narrow three-bladed propellers. Its internal bombload was 2,000 lb (908 kg), while a provision was also made for two 50-gal (227 1itre) underwing drop tanks or two 250lb bombs. Total war production of all Mosquito models in Britain gave more than 6,700 aircraft. In 1942 production was also launched in Canada in Australia, adding totals of some 1,100 and 210 aircraft, respectively. The Mosquito flew with the RAF and other air forces in the European and Mediterranean theatres. Later Mark Mosquitoes were also operated by the RAF in the South East Asia and by the Royal Australian Air Force. Colour schemes included in the kit: 1) de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito B Mk.IV (Srs.II), DZ548, Sky GB-D ʻKnave of Diamondsʼ, No.105 Sq., Royal Air Force, Marham airfield, June 1943 2) de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito B Mk.IV (Srs.II), DZ515, Sky XD-M, No.139 (Jamaica) Sq., Royal Air Force, Horsham St. Faith airfield, summer 1942 3) de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito B Mk.IV (Srs.II), DZ518, Red AZ-F, No.627 Sq., Royal Air Force, Woodhall Spa airfield, August 1944 4) de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito B Mk.IV (Srs.II), DZ525, Red AZ-S, No.627 Sq., Royal Air Force, Woodhall Spa airfield, 1945 This injection-moulded kit contains 64 parts and eleven clear parts (the cockpit canopy, nose window, wing tips with position lights etc.). A comprehensive decal sheet is included.
  2. AX09186: Bristol Blenheim Mk.IF NEW TOOLING Arguably one of the most significant aircraft of the inter war years, the Bristol Blenheim can trace its lineage back to a privately funded venture and a determination to place Britain at the head of the aviation world. Frustrated by a succession of aviation records achieved by overseas manufacturers, Lord Rothermere, owner of the Daily Mail Newspaper and keen observer of the aviation scene, invited Britain’s leading aircraft manufacturers to do something about the situation. Resolved to capture the civilian aircraft world speed record for Britain, he offered to fund the development of an aircraft capable of achieving this feat, which eventually resulted in the Bristol Type 142 taking to the air. This sleek, twin engined design was both beautiful to look at and extremely fast in the air, easily managing to capture a new world speed record for a civilian passenger aircraft. Setting a new mark of 307 mph, the new Bristol design gave Lord Rothermere what he had been desperately hoping for and he christened the spectacular new aircraft ‘Britain First’. In widespread service with the Royal Air Force at the start of WWII, the Bristol Blenheim and its brave crews would be asked to shoulder a heavy burden in the months that followed, with a Blenheim mounting Britain’s first sortie of the war just 63 minutes after war was declared against Germany. Living up to the name ‘Britain First’ Lord Rothermere bestowed on his spectacular Bristol Type 142 civilian transport and inspiration for the Blenheim, these aircraft went into combat determined to show Britain’s defiance and determination to prevail in this second global conflict. Significantly, the pace of aviation development in the 1930s continued to increase and whilst the Blenheim was a ground-breaking aircraft design when it first entered RAF service, it was quickly outclassed by the latest breed of fast monoplane fighters. With relatively light defensive armament and weighed down with the equipment of war, gallant Blenheim crews would suffer terrible losses at the hands of the Luftwaffe, particularly during the early months of WWII.
  3. AIMSP48008: Junkers Ju-87B-1/Ju-87B-2 'Stuka' replacement radiator (designed to be used with Airfix kits)
  4. VAL48008: Britten-Norman BN-2A Islander (G-AVCN, G-BCEN)
  5. EDEX626: Bristol Blenheim Mk.IF 1/48 (designed to be used with Airfix kits)
  6. DKD72065: Havoc Night Fighters
  7. SBS72046: Gloster Gladiator Mk.I/Mk.II rigging set (designed to be used with Airfix kits)
  8. SW72119: U-125 JASDF Air Rescue (Hawker Beechcraft) 2 markings Of Air Rescue
  9. MKM14491: Supermarine Spitfire Mk.XVIII ‘Mighty Eighteen’ (2in1 = 2 kits in 1 box) (RAF, Indian AF) The Supermarine Type 394 Spitfire Mk.XVIII was a British fighter evolved from the F Mk.XIVE and was conceived as a ‘Super Spitfire’. Unfortunately, it came too late for wartime use. There was no prototype built while the first serial aircraft flew in June 1945. Production ended in early 1946 and totalled 200 Spitfire F Mk.XVIIIs and 100 FR Mk.XVIIIs, the latter being a fighter-reconnaissance variant with one oblique and two vertical cameras in the rear fuselage. It was a single-seat monoplane aircraft with cut-down rear fuselage and enlarged rudder. It was of all metal construction, powered by a two-stage supercharged RR Griffon engine. It carried extra fuel and had a revised, stronger wing structure. A full-span or clipped E-type wing was fitted mounting two 20mm cannons and two 0.5" (12.7mm) machine guns. Three 500lb bombs or various types of rocket projectiles could also be carried. Spitfire Mk.XVIIIs were mostly issued to the squadrons in the Middle East and Far East, where they were active against guerrillas during the HYPERLINK "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malayan_Emergency" o "Malayan Emergency" Malayan Emergency in the late 1940s. From late 1947 to mid-1949 India bought 100 ex-RAF aircraft. Colour schemes included in the kit: 1) Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire F Mk.XVIII (Type 394), TP222, White B, No.60 Sq. (based at Seletar, Singapore), Royal Air Force, Far East Air Force (FEAF), Kuala Lumpur Air Base, Malayan Union, 1947 2) Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FR Mk.XVIII (Type 394), TZ233, White T, No.208 Sq., Royal Air Force, Middle East Air Force (MEAF), Fayid Air Base, Egypt, 1949-51 3) Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FR Mk.XVIII (Type 394), TP424, White T, No.28 Sq., Royal Air Force, Far East Air Force (FEAF), Kai Tak Air Base, Hong Kong, August 1949 – February 1950 4) Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FR Mk.XVIII (Type 394), HS636, White 96, Advanced Flying School (India), Indian Air Force, Ambala Air Force Station, India, 1948 Two injection-moulded kits are supplied in this box and each kit contains 31 parts and one clear part (the cockpit canopy). A comprehensive decal sheet is included.
  10. DKD72060: Night Intruders, Pt.1 (Mosquito, Whirlwind, Defiant, Hurricane, Boston)
  11. NF108: BIRTH OF A LEGEND McDONNELL F4H-1 PHANTOM II 185-pages, 69-color photos, 251-b&w photos, 127-illustrations. In late 1953, McDonnell Aircraft made an unsolicited proposal to the U.S. Navy for a big, carrier-based, supersonic, "All-Weather Attack Fighter". After not much more than a cursory review, it was rejected. That inauspicious beginning subsequently resulted in one of the world's best known jet fighters, the F-4H/F-4 Phantom. This book covers the 1st 47 F4H-1/F-4A aircraft. This monograph by highly regarded U.S. Naval aircraft historian Tommy H. Thomason documents in well-illustrated detail how the Phantom came to be, including previously unpublished information about the Bureau of Aeronautics evaluation in 1954 of unsolicited proposals from other manufacturers competing for the Navy's fighter business that resulted in the award of a development contract to McDonnell for the AH-1; the conflict within the Navy over the decision to convert it to a all missile-armed, fleet-air-defense fighter, the F4H; and the fly-off between the F4H and the Vought F8U-3. Also illustrated in three-view drawings and photographs are the evolution of the configuration from the proposal to the final one that took flight in 1958. The most significant steps in the process of designing , developing, and evaluating the Phantom in the late 1950s are highlighted, with a discussion and depictions of the most significant new technology incorporated and the changes that rested. A description of each of the flights that resulted in records and two that tragically didn't is included. At least one photograph is provided of each of the first 47 F4Hs, along with a summary history of each one from its first flight to the circumstances of its withdrawal from service and the location of the 10 known survivors. Other sections provide a matrix by Bureau Number of configurations, cockpit and technical illustrations of interest to modelers, a summary of model kits/conversions available, and color photographs of notable F4Hs and test pilots. cover NF108 ads.jpg Naval Fighters Number 108
  12. EDFE935: Bristol Blenheim Mk.IF (designed to be used with Airfix kits)
  13. SBS72048: de Havilland Dh.82a Tiger Moth rigging set & wheels (designed to be used with Airfix kits)
  14. QB72583: Mikoyan MiG-21MF correct exhaust nozzle (designed to be used with Eduard kits)
  15. CSM32-002: Nieuport XVII Late
  16. MT35248: German Panzergrenadiers (WWII)
  17. MT35599: BRITISH RUCKSACKS, BAGS & FOLDED CANVAS WWII Box contains models of British Ammunition.
  18. EDEX627: Bristol Blenheim Mk.IF TFace 1/48 (designed to be used with Airfix kits)
  19. MKM14489: Supermarine Spitfire Mk.XIV Bubbletop ‘In Europe’ (2in1 = 2 kits in 1 box) (RAF, RAAF, Belgian AF) The Supermarine Type 379 Spitfire Mk.XIV was a British fighter developed during WWII. It was the most important of the Griffon-powered Spitfires, and the only one to see significant wartime service. The Mk.XIV was also the most successful in intercepting V-1 flying bombs. Based on the Mk.VIII fuselage, the first development Mk.XIV flew early in 1943. Initially the aircraft were produced with high-back fuselage, but later cut-down rear fuselage with a teardrop canopy was introduced. It was a single-seat monoplane aircraft, of all metal construction, powered by a two-stage supercharged RR Griffon engine. Early aircraft used full-span C-type universal wing, with two 20mm cannons and four 0.303" (7.7mm) machine guns, while later production aircraft were fitted with the E wing mounting two 20mm cannons and two 0.5" (12.7mm) MGs. Fuselage fuel tank or up to 1000 lbs of bombs (500lb bomb in a FR role) could also be carried. Spitfire FR Mk.XIV and FR Mk.XIVE were fighter-reconnaissance versions with an oblique F.24 camera installed. Both variants had clipped wing tips for low-level use. Deliveries began in October 1943 and the production of Mark XIV variants totalled 957. A number of RAF units were operational in Europe up to the end of war, while introduction of Mk.XIVs into Far East theatre in June 1945 was too late for wartime use. In the late 1940s Spitfire F.XIV/FR.XIVs were also delivered to Belgium (a total of 132 a/c), India (20) and Thailand (30). Colour schemes included in the kit: 1) Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire F Mk.XIV (Type 379), NH745, Sky EB-V, No.41 Sq., Royal Air Force, Eindhoven airfield (B-78), the Netherlands, March 1945 2) Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FR Mk.XIV (Type 379), MV263, Sky GCK, No.125 Wing, Royal Air Force, Twente airfield (B-106), the Netherlands, April 1945 3) Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FR Mk.XIVE (Type 379), NH895, Sky NI-K, No.451 Sq., Royal Australian Air Force, British Air Forces of Occupation (BAFO), Wunstorf Air Base, Germany, late 1945 4) Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire FR Mk.XIV (Type 379), SG-46 (ex-RM625), Black UR-G, No.2 Sq. (2ème Esc.), Belgian Air Force (l'Aéronautique Militaire Belge), Florennes Air Base, autumn 1948 Two injection-moulded kits are supplied in this box and each kit contains 31 parts and one clear part (the cockpit canopy). A comprehensive decal sheet is included.
  20. MKM14494: de Havilland Mosquito PR.IV--B.IV ’Special Liveries’ (RAF, BOAC, Luftwaffe) The de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito was a British multi-role combat aircraft developed in 1939. The Mosquito was constructed almost entirely of wood and, as such, it was dubbed “The Wooden Wonderˮ. Originally conceived as an unarmed high-speed bomber, it was later adapted to many other roles, including day-time tactical bomber, night bomber, day or night fighter, fighter-bomber, maritime interceptor and photo-reconnaissance aircraft. The Mosquito B Mk.IV was a day and night bomber variant, whose prototype first flew in September 1941. Some 300 aircraft were built (incl. Srs.I a/c); Series II model entered service in May 1942. It was a two-seat, twin-engine, mid-wing monoplane, of a composite wood construction, fitted with a retractable undercarriage. The crew was seated under conventional canopy and for bombing a glazed nose was provided. It was powered by two Merlin in-line engines turning narrow three-bladed propellers. Its internal bombload was 2,000 lb (908 kg), while a provision was also made for two 50-gal (227 1itre) underwing drop tanks or two 250lb bombs. 27 Mosquito B Mk.IVs were converted to the PR Mk.IV photo-reconnaissance aircraft, equipped with four vertical and one oblique camera. The first operational flight by a PR Mk.IV was made in April 1942. It was also used by the BOAC as a fast transport aeroplane to carry high-value cargo to, and from, neutral countries, such as Sweden. In 1944 a captured Mosquito B Mk.IV was tested by the Trials and Research Unit of the Luftwaffe. Colour schemes included in the kit: 1) de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito PR Mk.IV, DK310, Sky LY-G, No.1 PRU, Royal Air Force, Benson airfield, summer 1942 2) de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito PR Mk.IV, DZ473, No.540 Sq., Royal Air Force, Leuchars airfield, photographing Peenemünde with V-2 rockets, June 1943 3) de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito PR Mk.IV, G-AGFV (ex-DZ411), Black G-AGFV outlined in Light Grey, British Overseas Airways Corporation (BOAC), Leuchars airfield, used for high-speed diplomatic courier and “ball-bearing” flights between the UK and Sweden, early 1943 4) de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito B Mk.IV (Srs.II), Black T9+XB, 2./VVB OKL Trials and Research Unit of the Luftwaffe High Command (Versuchsverband des Oberkommandos der Luftwaffe), Luftwaffe, Königsberg-Neumark airfield, Germany, summer 1944 This injection-moulded kit contains 64 parts and eleven clear parts (the cockpit canopy, nose window, wing tips with position lights etc.). A comprehensive decal sheet is included.